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Freshwater Crayfish Care: The Basics

Just a few months back I decided to get into a very interesting hobby. That hobby is crayfish. A blue crayfish to be exact.

When I first got my blue crayfish, I thought it would be just something nice to have around the house. – A nice little something to show friends and family that stopped by the house. Little did I know however how interesting these little critters would be.

Every single day I find myself watching my crayfish in my fish tank climbing on top of the fish tank’s ornaments, picking up rocks and literally carrying them. It’s all pretty fascinating.

Crayfish are definitely fun. However, if you plan on getting into this hobby, you will need to know a little bit about freshwater crayfish care.

The Right Fish Tank

When selecting a tank for your crayfish, I suggest not getting anything smaller than a 10 gallon tank. Some people may tell you differently, but crayfish need a bit of room. Crayfish also put out a lot of waste, so a smaller tank might not be as efficient for removing waste. – And in the case you want to get your crayfish some tank mates, which you probably will, you are going to need at least a 10 gallon tank.

The Water

Before you put your crayfish into the tank. You will need to make sure the water is conditioned and that your tank is cycled. Conditioning the water just involves simply adding a chemical to the water you put in. That part is very easy.

Cycling the water involves giving the tank time to build up enough beneficial bacteria within the tank to process and remove waste produced by the crayfish and/or fish. This can be done by many different methods. I suggest researching and determining which way is best for you. One way is to simply add fish food to your tank for about seven days. During this time you will not want to add fish as they will probably die. – But keep in mind, cycling your tank is the most important part of freshwater crayfish care.

Hideouts

Providing your crayfish with a “hideout” is also extremely important. Crayfish love to hideout and hangout in dark places. Also having a hideout is important for crayfish when they molt. That’s because when crayfish molt they become very soft and sometimes other fish or other crayfish will try to attack them.

Tank Mates

When choosing tank mates, you want to be sure that you choose fish that are fast and/or swim near the top of the tank. If you don’t, your fish could end up being a snack for your crayfish.

Speaking of snacks, what do crayfish eat? Crayfish are omnivores and basically eat everything. They of course eat fish, but also plants, bloodworms, sinking pellets, etc. I feed mine a sinking pellet daily and this is plenty.

Written by soufiane

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